"Russkoye Pole", Millet Grain (Psheno), 900g

"Russkoye Pole", Millet Grain (Psheno), 900g
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Price: $4.69

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Description

 

The millets are a group of small-seeded species of cereal crops or grains, widely grown around the world for food and fodder. They have been in cultivation in East Asia for the last 10,000 years. Millet fields in the Annapurna-region of Nepal.

As a food source Millets are major food sources in arid and semi-arid regions of the world, and feature in the traditional cuisine of many others. In Western India, Sorghum , has been commonly used with millet flour for hundreds of years to make the local staple hand rolled Millet porridge is a traditional food in Russian, German and Chinese —Āuisines. In Russia it is eaten sweet (with milk and sugar added at the end of the cooking process) or savoury with meat or vegetable stews. In China it is eaten without milk or sugar, frequently with beans, sweet potato, and/or various types of squash; millet soup is commonly used by nursing mothers to aid in milk production and healing from childbirth. In Germany it is also eaten sweet (boiled in water with apples added during the boiling process and honey added during the cooling process).

People with coeliac disease can replace certain gluten-containing cereals in their diets with millet. Millets are also used as bird and animal feed.

The protein content in millet is very close to that of wheat; both provide about 11% protein by weight. Millets are rich in B vitamins, especially niacin, B6 and folic acid, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. Millets contain no gluten, so they are not suitable for raised bread. When combined with wheat, (or xanthan gum for those who have coeliac disease), they can be used for raised bread. Alone, they are suited for flatbread.

As none of the millets are closely related to wheat, they are appropriate foods for those with coeliac disease or other forms of allergies/intolerance of wheat. However, millets are also a mild thyroid peroxidase inhibitor and probably should not be consumed in great quantities by those with thyroid disease.

Preparation:

The basic preparation consists in washing the millet and toasting it while moving until one notes a characteristic scent. Then five measures of boiling water for each two measures of millet are added with some sugar or salt. The mixture is cooked covered using low flame for 30-35 minutes.

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